Saturday, November 27, 2021

Marvel’s god, the One Above All, is the final villain of Immortal Hulk

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This article originally appeared on www.polygon.com

Al Ewing’s Immortal Hulk finished out its run this week with an extra-long 50th issue in which several of Bruce Banner’s alternate personalities came face-to-face with the series’ ultimate cosmic villain: The One Below All.

If that doesn’t ring a bell for you, well, the Marvel Comics universe has a lot of gods, whether they’re Norse, Eternal, or giant robots. Above all those, it has The One Above All, introduced in a 2004 issue of Fantastic Four. Ewing’s Immortal Hulk introduced the One Below All as, get this, the big, green, hate-filled counterpart of God, and the creator of all gamma-mutated characters in the Marvel Universe.

So, naturally, the climax of the final issue involves the Hulk literally yelling at God, demanding to be told why he was made, if it’s just to suffer.

What else is happening in the pages of our favorite comics? We’ll tell you. Welcome to Monday Funnies, Polygon’s weekly list of the books that our comics editor enjoyed this past week. It’s part society pages of superhero lives, part reading recommendations, part “look at this cool art.” There may be some spoilers. There may not be enough context. But there will be great comics. (And if you missed the last edition, read this.)


Immortal Hulk #50

The One Above All, a massive glowing yellow human figure appears in Immortal Hulk #50 (2021).

Image: Al Ewing, Joe Bennett/Marvel Comics

Also, for the first time in its pages, Immortal Hulk featured an appearance from the One Above All.

Wonder Woman #780

“My greatest hope was for others to take up my cause after I died,” a resurrected Wonder Woman tells Queen Nubia. “Wonder Woman isn’t just me anymore,” in Wonder Woman #780 (2021).

Image: Michael W. Conrad, Becky Cloonan, Travis Moore/DC Comics

One significant mark of a superhero’s importance within their setting is that they have an established supporting cast that remains consistent over time and different creative teams. So one of the things that makes me the most excited about Wonder Woman over the next year is that there will soon be three ongoing books under her umbrella — four, if you count Justice League.

That’s a lot of development of her supporting cast, and this weekend we found out something even more exciting: All those books are winding up for the first crossover event spinning out of the Wonder Woman mythos since 1991.

Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton #5

“I don’t want to die,” says Skippy. “We’re not going to kill you. We’re just going to beat you up real bad,” answers a burly man. “Well, I don’t want that, either! Shit shit shit shit shit,” yelps Skippy as he runs out of the room, leaving his friends behind in Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton #5 (2021).

Image: Kyle Starks, Chris Schweizer/Image Comics

Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton continues delightfully on every level. Here, we see the running gag of the Sidekicks encountering a threatening situation and Skippy immediately beating feet. But it’s the motif of his repeating “SHIT SHIT SHIT” in a string of connected word balloons that follows his retreat like footprints in a Family Circus comic — that’s what keeps it funny every time. Just the best work.

Suicide Squad: King Shark #5

A photograph of a toddler King Shark in blue swim trunks, holding his mom’s hand at the beach and pointing happily in Suicide Squad: King Shark #5 (2021).

Image: Tim Seeley, Scott Kolins/DC Comics

It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this baby picture of King Shark. Should we call him Prince Shark?

This article originally appeared on www.polygon.com

Al Ewing’s Immortal Hulk finished out its run this week with an extra-long 50th issue in which several of Bruce Banner’s alternate personalities came face-to-face with the series’ ultimate cosmic villain: The One Below All.

If that doesn’t ring a bell for you, well, the Marvel Comics universe has a lot of gods, whether they’re Norse, Eternal, or giant robots. Above all those, it has The One Above All, introduced in a 2004 issue of Fantastic Four. Ewing’s Immortal Hulk introduced the One Below All as, get this, the big, green, hate-filled counterpart of God, and the creator of all gamma-mutated characters in the Marvel Universe.

So, naturally, the climax of the final issue involves the Hulk literally yelling at God, demanding to be told why he was made, if it’s just to suffer.

What else is happening in the pages of our favorite comics? We’ll tell you. Welcome to Monday Funnies, Polygon’s weekly list of the books that our comics editor enjoyed this past week. It’s part society pages of superhero lives, part reading recommendations, part “look at this cool art.” There may be some spoilers. There may not be enough context. But there will be great comics. (And if you missed the last edition, read this.)


Immortal Hulk #50

The One Above All, a massive glowing yellow human figure appears in Immortal Hulk #50 (2021).

Image: Al Ewing, Joe Bennett/Marvel Comics

Also, for the first time in its pages, Immortal Hulk featured an appearance from the One Above All.

Wonder Woman #780

“My greatest hope was for others to take up my cause after I died,” a resurrected Wonder Woman tells Queen Nubia. “Wonder Woman isn’t just me anymore,” in Wonder Woman #780 (2021).

Image: Michael W. Conrad, Becky Cloonan, Travis Moore/DC Comics

One significant mark of a superhero’s importance within their setting is that they have an established supporting cast that remains consistent over time and different creative teams. So one of the things that makes me the most excited about Wonder Woman over the next year is that there will soon be three ongoing books under her umbrella — four, if you count Justice League.

That’s a lot of development of her supporting cast, and this weekend we found out something even more exciting: All those books are winding up for the first crossover event spinning out of the Wonder Woman mythos since 1991.

Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton #5

“I don’t want to die,” says Skippy. “We’re not going to kill you. We’re just going to beat you up real bad,” answers a burly man. “Well, I don’t want that, either! Shit shit shit shit shit,” yelps Skippy as he runs out of the room, leaving his friends behind in Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton #5 (2021).

Image: Kyle Starks, Chris Schweizer/Image Comics

Six Sidekicks of Trigger Keaton continues delightfully on every level. Here, we see the running gag of the Sidekicks encountering a threatening situation and Skippy immediately beating feet. But it’s the motif of his repeating “SHIT SHIT SHIT” in a string of connected word balloons that follows his retreat like footprints in a Family Circus comic — that’s what keeps it funny every time. Just the best work.

Suicide Squad: King Shark #5

A photograph of a toddler King Shark in blue swim trunks, holding his mom’s hand at the beach and pointing happily in Suicide Squad: King Shark #5 (2021).

Image: Tim Seeley, Scott Kolins/DC Comics

It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this baby picture of King Shark. Should we call him Prince Shark?

Source link Author Susana Polo on date 2021-10-18 17:51:03 Polygon is a gaming website in partnership with Vox Media. Their culture focused site covers games, their creators, the fans, trending stories and entertainment news. Follow them for more

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