Thursday, October 28, 2021

Wellington today, October 14: Wild waves to become more common, Harbourside Market is back

Kia ora Pōneke. Here’s what you need to know from The Dominion Post today, plus breaking news and events from around the capital.

1.40pm: Canines on the Cable Car

The Wellington Cable Car will trial allowing dogs to travel on board during the month of November ahead of a decision whether to make the service available on a permanent basis.

Well socialised dogs would be allowed to travel on off-peak services for a $2 fare which would be donated to the SPCA during the trial.

Four-legged passengers must be on a leash and would be limited to one per handling human. Anyone taking a dog must be over 16 years old and would be responsible for any mess created on the Cable Car or at the terminal or stations.

Cable Car chief executive Cesar Piotto said the trial was designed to make the green spaces more accessible for the growing number of inner city residents.

“As more people move into the central city, we want them to be able to access the Wellington Botanic Garden ki Paekākā and green spaces in the area to take their four-legged friends out for walks,” Piotto said.

The Wellington Cable car will trial allowing dogs to travel on the capital's iconic funicular during November.

Supplied/Stuff

The Wellington Cable car will trial allowing dogs to travel on the capital’s iconic funicular during November.

12pm: Two-car crash in Upper Hutt

Fergusson Drive, Upper Hutt, is blocked after a two-car collision at the roundabout intersected by Whakatiki st.

There were no injuries in the crash which happened shortly after 11.17am.

Police said one vehicle remained blocking the road as of 12pm.

11.31: Lockdowns delay breast cancer diagnoses for more than 100 women

Helen Jonas is feeling a bit rubbish. Her sweet spot during chemo is the last five or six days in the three-weekly cycle.

But the Hawke’s Bay Department of Conservation ranger had a session last week, so she’s fatigued and foggy.

This “cocktail of poison”, as she describes it, is a necessary evil though, to beat the breast cancer diagnosis she was lumped with six months ago when she went for routine screening.

“It was very much like I dodged a bullet by knowing … I found out early enough to do something about it.”

The Breast Cancer Foundation estimates at least 133 New Zealanders have breast cancer and don’t know, due to screening delays caused by lockdowns.

Wellington b​​​​​reast surgeon Dr Alex Brown said clincians were all working hard to minimise delays but extra resourcing would help.

“It is challenging to catch up and comes down to resourcing and the availability of equipment,” Brown, who made time for an interview between surgeries, said.

Read the full story by Rachel Thomas.

Helen Jonas is undergoing treatment for breast cancer, which was detected in April.

SUPPLIED

Helen Jonas is undergoing treatment for breast cancer, which was detected in April.

10.15am: Swollen tides, wild waves to become more common, scientist warns

The king tide – a much higher-than-usual tide that saw the sea reach the bottom of boat sheds in Wellington Harbour at high tide about 11.30am – was caused by the moon and sun being in alignment, with both of their gravity pulling on the oceans.

Added to this, the moon was at the lowest point in its elliptical course around the world, meaning its pull was stronger.

Gale force winds and swells of up to 6 metres hit Wellington’s south coast with the Wellington City Council closing a section of the coastal road where rocks had washed up near the airport, and a section where large bits of debris washed up between Ōwhiro and Island bays.

National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (Niwa) coast and estuaries chief scientist Scott Stephens said the scenario was going to become more common with climate change-induced sea level rises.

Read the full story by Tom Hunt here.

ROSS GIBLIN/STUFF

Big waves around Wellington’s south coast on Wednesday ripped up tarmac near Ōwhiro Bay and threw a tree stump across the road.

8.55am: Sunday shoppers rejoice, Harbourside Market is back

Wellington’s Harbourside Market will reopen this Sunday with Covid alert level 2 restrictions in place.

Level 2 guidelines allow the market to open with no restrictions on numbers, but with structures in place to ensure physical distancing and mandatory mask wearing. There will be manned QR code stations at main entry points to the market site in addition to each stall having their own code.

The market will be using the whole of Barnett St carpark for produce trucks only, and both the Waitangi Stream Promenade and Te Papa Promenade for generously spaced food vendors.

No additional seating will be available within the market, instead people will be encouraged to move along the waterfront to find a seated spot.

Wellington’s Harbourside Market will reopen this Sunday 15 with alert level 2 restrictions in place.

Supplied/Stuff

Wellington’s Harbourside Market will reopen this Sunday 15 with alert level 2 restrictions in place.

Wellington weather

The southerly gales that bashed Wellington on Wednesday – and the swells – are easing. It’s clouding over a bit now, but I can report that the sun has been shining this morning through the Stuff office windows.

For the morning commute, all roads previously closed by debris on Wednesday – Moa Point Rd by the airport, Marine Pde in Eastbourne, and Ōwhiro Bay Pde – have reopened.

8.15am: Labour MP Kieran McAnulty ’emotional’ after selling trusty ute

Wairarapa MP Kieran McAnulty says he got about emotional as he gets selling his well-known ute.

The 1997 Mazda Bounty with 437,000 kilometres on the clock was sold to a new owner on Wednesday for $3400.

“It’s quite a sad moment,” the Labour politician said on Wednesday evening. “I’m not going to lie, this is about as emotional as I get, personally.”

The money was split between rural support trusts in Wairarapa, Central Hawke’s Bay and Tararua – the three major areas in McAnulty’s electorate.

Read the full story by André Chumko here.

SUPPLIED

Wairarapa MP Kieran McAnulty takes the Prime Minister for a ride in his famous red ute.

7.30am: Wahine Māori artist shines at Te Tairāwhiti Arts Festival

Te Tairāwhiti Arts Festival in Gisborne is in full swing, showcasing some of the best talents Ngāi Māori has to offer in many areas, including arts, dance, music and theatre.

One of the talented people participating is Wellington-based artist Ariki Brightwell.

Of Māori, Cook Island, and Tahitian descent, Brightwell’s work has been on display throughout the motu. Her most recent piece is Tūmoremore, a sculpture on display at the Te Ara i Whiti light trail at the festival.

TE AO

Artist Ariki Brightwell talks about her new sculpture, Tūmoremore, unveiled for the first time at the Te Tairāwhiti Arts Festival in Gisborne.

Metlink alerts and cancellations

Buses continue to replace weekday daytime train services on the Wairarapa line, excluding peak services due to maintenance.

Follow the link to check your bus and train commute for more alerts and cancellations.

‘We over-assess shockingly in NZ’: Wellington Girls’ College to stop NCEA level 1

Wellington Girls’ College will drop NCEA level 1 in 2023, in an effort to stop over-assessing students.

The all-girls secondary school is the first in the capital to opt out of year 11 exams, although principal Julia Davidson believes others may follow.

Schools “over-assess shockingly” in New Zealand, she said.

Read the full story by Ellen O’Dwyer.

Wellington Girls' College will ditch NCEA Level 1 from 2023 – the first school in Wellington to do so.

Kevin Stent/Stuff

Wellington Girls’ College will ditch NCEA Level 1 from 2023 – the first school in Wellington to do so.

GPs begging patients to get vaccinated as disparity widens

Māori and Pasifika healthcare workers are literally begging patients to get vaccinated as burnout sets in and vaccination disparity grows.

New vaccination figures from the Ministry of Health show that urban areas continue to be vaccinated against Covid-19 in higher numbers than rural areas, and areas with a higher Māori and Pacific population.

Dr Maryann Heather, of the Pasifika Medical Association, said the figures were consistent with what she and her colleagues had seen in communities.

Read the full story by André Chumko here.

STUFF

DIrector-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield announces 55 new cases of Covid-19 in the community on October 13.

Kāpiti plans to grow up and out as it makes room for 32,000 more people

Kāpiti plans to grow up and grow out, constructing more high-rise buildings and building homes on undeveloped land.

The draft blueprint for its future was approved by Kāpiti Coast District councillors on September 30 and the public will soon get to have their say on proposed changes – including transforming central Paraparaumu into a city centre.

Called Growing Well: Our proposed approach for enabling sustainable growth in Kāpiti, the draft plan is in response to Kāpiti’s expected growth over the next 30 years which will see a need for about 14,000 homes as it makes room for at least 32,000 more people.

Read Mandy Te’s full story.

Central Paraparaumu is set to undergo the most change – with plans for it to become Kāpiti's main city centre.

MONIQUE FORD/Stuff

Central Paraparaumu is set to undergo the most change – with plans for it to become Kāpiti’s main city centre.

And in the arts…

The secret life of the Aotearoa play and its international reach

From August 2019 and into pre-Covid 2020, a tour of Conversations avec mon Pénis ​took French-Canada’s Quebec and northern Ontario – producers Bistouri Theatre​ tell us – “by storm”.

Images of a female actor in a grotesque penis costume in different public spaces on social media probably also helped, but this tour followed several years of popular productions, and it returns to Québécois cities and towns from November.

Read Mark Amery’s column.

Gândește-Te La Africa (Think of Africa) by Gordon Dryland translated by Raluca Paun at Teatrul National Marin Sorescu, Craiova, Romania.

supplied

Gândește-Te La Africa (Think of Africa) by Gordon Dryland translated by Raluca Paun at Teatrul National Marin Sorescu, Craiova, Romania.

This article first show on www.stuff.co.nz Source link Author WELLINGTON REPORTERS on date 2021-10-14 00:46:30

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